Hornsby Shire Council [Case Study]

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

At McCrindle, our forecasts identify trends. Our strategy informs decisions. Our research future-proofs organisations. The social, generational, economic and demographic trends impacting local communities create not only new challenges but great opportunities. Unprecedented change can sometimes lead to change fatigue where the response can be to become worried about change, or equally it can lead to change apathy which can create an indifference to change. However, by understanding the emerging trends, we can be more prepared for the changes and so rather than becoming defensive or blasé we can respond to the shifts, influence the trends and shape the future.

We are engaged by some of the leading brands and organisations across Australia to help them understand the ever-changing external environment in which they operate and to assist them in identifying and responding to the key trends.

It is a privilege to see our research in action in the Hornsby Shire’s bench-marking report. This report has been designed to inform community members, councillors, staff and other government agencies about local issues for Hornsby Shire residents. The results of our research can be summarised in the following top 10 trends we identified across the Hornsby Shire. 

Top 10 trends for the Hornsby Shire

  1. Growing population, increasing densification
  2. Ageing population, transitioning generations
  3. Educational attainment, professional employment
  4. Entrepreneurship for small and home-based businesses
  5. Property ownership and investment growth
  6. Stable workforce, lower unemployment
  7. Mobile lifestyle enabled though public transport and cars
  8. A home for families and the next generations
  9. A place of cultural and language diversity
  10. The lifestyle shire

Read or download the report for the latest demographic and social trends insights affecting Hornsby Shire


About McCrindle Research Solutions

For great organisations, innovation is the oxygen of success. To innovate effectively, organisations need to understand the times and track the trends. Our market and social research services not only utilise the best research tools but ensure that the findings can be implemented by incorporating the most useful research output. Check our our Research Solutions pack to see how we can assist your organisation today.

McCrindle Research: Celebrating 10 Years, 2006 to 2016

Thursday, August 18, 2016


It was late August 2006, John Howard was Prime Minister, George W Bush was the US President, the Football World Cup had just wrapped up in Germany, Facebook had just been launched to the public, and McCrindle Research began operations in a newly opened area of Norwest Business Park in Sydney.

It was just a decade ago, but what a decade of change it has been. There was no iPhone, no tablet computers, Twitter was only just being developed, YouTube was just a year old and words like “apps”, “Wi-Fi” , “memes” and “selfies” meant nothing. In the year we began our research, “hashtag” was the rarely used character on the keyboard, “the cloud” was what could be seen in the sky, things “going viral” was an issue for public health and “tablets” were medications.



When we ran our first demographic analysis soon after we began, the 2006 Census had only just been held, and we were relying on the 2001 data which was based on the Australian population of 18.9 million compared to the 24.2 million of today.

McCrindle Research began with Mark McCrindle and a simple vision to “conduct world class research and communicate the insights in innovative ways”. Since those first days the research approach has grown from pen and paper surveys and focus groups to include online surveys, on-device surveys, data analytics, demographic and economic modelling and geomapping. True to the vision of engaging, visual output, the first person McCrindle Research employed was a designer, Mark Beard, who did an amazing job in the early months of developing a digital presence, and deploying research reports in visual forms and designing the data even before the genre of infographics existed.

Since then McCrindle has grown to be well regarded as one of the best research-based communications agencies and data designers in Australia with our research findings more likely to be presented via an event, interactive webpage, corporate keynote, infographic wall, pop-up banner, animated data video, visual report or media launch rather than just a written report.



It was in that first year that we designed “Australia’s Population Map” which has now been updated and reprinted dozens of times with hundreds of thousands in print. We love analysing numbers so here are some relating to our digital presence: we’ve had more than a third of a million YouTube views in addition to our Slideshare, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook presence, and almost a million blog and website visits. We analyse big data and create big data of our own with hundreds of research projects completed, involving thousands of focus group participants and hundreds of thousands of survey completions. 

So it has been a busy decade for us and a transformative one for our world. As we look at the decade ahead, one thing is sure: the speed of change will only increase, and we will continue to analyse the trends and effectively communicate the strategic implications to help organisations and leaders know the times.




find out more About McCrindle Research Services



#TuesdayTrend

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

#TuesdayTrend


As Australia’s social researchers, we take the pulse of the nation. We research communities. We survey society. We analyse the trends. And we communicate the findings.

Every Tuesday we release a trend about Australia for #TuesdayTrend. Be sure to follow, share and interact with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Follow us on:


ABOUT RESEARCH VISUALISATION


In a world of big data- we’re for visual data. We believe in the democratisation of information- that research should be accessible to everyone not just to the stats junkies. We’re passionate about turning tables into visuals, data into videos and reports into presentations. As researchers, we understand the methods but we’re also designers and we know what will communicate, and how to best engage. We’re in the business of making you look good and your data make sense.


For more information, please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you:

W: researchvisualisation.com

E: info@researchvisualisation.com

P: +61 2 8824 3422

Bringing Research Data to Life

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Last week Mark delivered the keynote address at the Tableau Data Conference 2016 on Bringing Research Data to Life. Here is an excerpt of his presentation:

Management expert Tom Peters is well known for his phrase “What gets measured gets done.” But we could add to that: what gets visualised gets read. What gets effectively communicated gets acted upon!

That’s why research is at its best when it tells a story, when it paints a picture, when it’s visual, when it’s research you can see.

World’s-best research will only spread as far as the look of it allows. World-changing data will have no impact unless it is well designed. World-class information will remain unshared unless it is easily understood.

Here at McCrindle, we’re social researchers. But in many ways we’re all social researchers. We all observe our society, study the patterns, and draw insights and conclusions from what we see.

But more than that. We’re all visual researchers. We gather information from what we see, we gather data from what we observe. It is the research that we see that we respond to best. When making decisions, it is the visual cues which guide us. Wear marks in grass show the most popular path, a show of hands, the length of a queue- these are visual research methods we employ to make decisions.

We live in a visual world. Languages are not universal but symbols are. Pictures not statistics connect across the generations.

And so we’re moving from an information era to an infographic era. In a world of big data- we need visual data.

It’s called reSEARCH for a reason, They’re called inSIGHTS on purpose, it’s more about visuals that tables, graphics not just analytics – you’ve got to see it before you can act upon it! Inaccessible research in the form of statistical tables and lengthy explanations won’t transform organisations.

Statistics should be fun- like animation. People should be able to play with data. Research reports should not sit on shelves but be interacted with, and shared on social media, or printed on book marks or beamed onto buildings.

Big data doesn’t have to be boring data!

Data is too important to be left in the hands of statisticians alone. Research needs to get beyond the researchers. We’re in an era of the democratisation of information. For this to be realised, big data has to be set free- and research has to be made accessible to everyone.

Research methodologies matter. Quality analysis is important. But making the data visual, creating research that you can see, ensuring the information tells a story - that’s absolutely critical.

Research that makes a difference has to be seen with the eyes of your head as well as the eyes of your heart. It makes sense rationally, and connect with it viscerally.

It’s about turning tables into visuals, statistics into videos and big data into visual data.

But research can’t be applied until it’s been understood.

It needs to be seen not just studied.

And until the last excel table has been transformed there’s work to be done.

ABOUT MARK MCCRINDLE

Mark is an award-winning social researcher, best-selling author, TedX speaker and influential thought leader, and is regularly commissioned to deliver strategy and advice to the boards and executive committees of some of Australia’s leading organisations.

Mark’s understanding of the key social trends as well as his engaging communication style places him in high demand in the press, on radio and on television shows, such as Sunrise, Today, The Morning Show, ABC News 24 and A Current Affair.

His research firm counts amongst its clients more than 100 of Australia’s largest companies and his highly valued reports and infographics have developed his regard as a data scientist, demographer, futurist and social commentator.


WATCH MARK'S TEDX TALK ON BRINGING RESEARCH DATA TO LIFE HERE

DOWNLOAD MARK'S SPEAKING PACK HERE

McCrindle in the Media

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

As Australia’s leading social researchers, the senior research team at McCrindle are actively involved in media commentary. From demographic analysis and future forecasts, to communication of key research findings and the identification of social trends, at McCrindle we are passionate about communicating insights in clear, accessible and useable ways.

Here are some of the most recent media pieces our research and team have been cited in:


Millenials found to be far more likely to quit work than other generations

“Millenials are a multi-career generation, moving from one job to another and from one job to further study or an overseas job. Mobility defines them,” he said.
“They’re a more educated cohort, they’re more tech-resourced. Even when they’re happy in a job they’re passive job hunters because they’re so well networked. People are approaching them on LinkedIn and they want to be future proofed.”
“They are looking for belonging and leading and shaping things. They want to be successful so if employers are empowering and involving them they will stay longer. A pay increase is a short-term fix but in the long term it’s all about engagement.”
CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


Buyers Swap 'Traditional Aussie Dream' For High Density Apartments

McCrinde Research social demographer Mark McCrindle concedes many foreign buyers are getting into the market, but said the lift in demand was also due to more Australian singles, couples and families opting for apartments.

Australia's booming population was underpinning the shift, he said, by pushing up demand for property of which apartments were an affordable type. "In less than 2 weeks we hit the 24 million mark and that's an increase of a million people in just around three years, so it's pretty significant growth," he told The Huffington Post Australia.


Inside Sydney’s homes of the future: A city of cities as homes get smaller and taller

McCrinde Research social demographer Mark McCrindle says Sydney's residential landscape will be forced to change to cope with the population growth, with multi-use residential developments the way of the future and a move away from CBD workplaces.

“We’re essentially going to be a city of cities, with not everyone working in the CBD,” Mark explains. “People will work in the suburbs, in business parks, and we will have second, third and fourth CBD areas where you work, live and play all within the locale.”




Why money is a big issue for Australian retirees in 2016

Social researcher Mark McCrindle said financial instability was an enemy of retirees. After the GFC a lot of people had to change their retirement plans and expectations because so much was wiped off,” he said.

Falling house prices in several states were adding uncertainty to retirees looking to downsize, Mr McCrindle said, while there were social impacts caused by children failing to leave the nest. “Retirees can’t quite make their own independent decisions because they still have adult children living at home.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE



According to Optus’ Renter of the Future report out today, three out of ten renting households consider themselves as “choice renters” who are not buying into the great Australian property dream. And when it comes to choice renters, they are three times more likely to be tech savvy.
The report, which was conducted by McCrindle Research shows that 2016 will see a new generation of tech-savvy renters who favour a lifestyle fuelled by freedom, flexibility and choice.
“We wanted to understand the renter and find out who they are. Demographically they’re got punch, geographically they’re got punch and as we’ve found from this technologically they’re amongst the earliest adopters,” said Mark McCrindle, social demographer.




Today's trends are coming at us faster than ever and have a life cycle that is shorter than we've ever seen before. Trends are increasingly global -- and with that, they're bigger, better, and faster.

From a generation who can track, monitor, record and analyse their every moment, to work that is increasingly being done in non-traditional places, here are some trends to watch in 2016.


CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE

A new population milestone

Friday, February 05, 2016

A new population milestone

Australia is fast closing in on the next population milestone of 24 million. In the early minutes of Tuesday 16 February 2016, at 12:51am, Australia will officially hit a population of 24,000,000. Because not everyone will be glued to the ABS Population clock (link) like us, we thought we’d give you an advanced peak at what it will show (we’re futurists after all!).

Doubling Australia’s population- in pace with the world

In 1968, Australia’s population reached 12 million and so it has taken 48 years to double. Interestingly, in 1970, the global population was exactly half what it currently is at 7.3 billion and so the world has taken only slightly less time, 46 years, to double.

More than one third of Australians have seen both Australia, and the world double in population size in their lifetime!

A new million- in record time

Australia reached 23 million on 23 April 2013 which means it has added its 24th million in 2 years, 9 months and 2 days. This is the first time that a million people has been added to Australia’s population in less than 3 years. From 1954 when the population hit 9 million, until 2003 when the population hit 20 million, each addition million was added in a time span of around 4 and a half years. From 20 to 23 million, the time span had decreased to add each million every 3 and a half years (keeping in mind the readjustment in the timing of Australia reaching 22 million which was altered due to population adjustments based on the results of the 2011 Census).

And 17 years ahead of schedule

When Australia’s population reached 19 million on 18 August 1999, the factors of population increase were such that the forecast was for the national population to reach 24 million in 2033. However rather than each new million being added every 7 to 9 years as was forecast based on the trends at the time, Australia is adding an extra million every 3 years (increasing from 21 million to 24 million in 8 years and 8 months).

Baby boom, longevity boom and migration growth

Not only has the fertility rate over the last decade been much higher than predicted (and the consequential record baby boom averaging 300,000 births per year), but the increase in life expectancy was also beyond these predictions. And while net migration numbers have been slowing over the last couple of years, growth from migration was, and still is above the forecasts of the late 20th Century.

40 million by 2050

As recently as 2009 the forecast was for the population to reach 36 million by 2050. However, even based on the more modest population growth rate of 1.5% (well below the highs of 1.9% achieved in recent years), Australia’s population will reach 40 million by mid-century, with the possibility of it being beyond 43 million (based on 1.7% annual growth).

24 million of 7.3 billion

While Australia’s population growth is significant in national terms, our new milestone of 24 million is small compared to the US population of 323 million. And in a global context, Australia’s share of the world’s population is just 0.32% - less than one-third of 1%!

Happy 24 millionth Australia!

2015 in review: Top trends of the year

Wednesday, January 06, 2016

As we begin 2016, we have taken a retrospective look at 2015 and the trends that were...

Most searched

Top “How to” search on Google Australia How to Tie a Tie

Top “What is?” search on Google Australia – Netflix

Top recipe search on Google Australia – Pancake Recipe

Most Globally Googled Topic – Paris Under Attack – 897+m searches


Colour of the year



Oxford Word of the Year


"Face with tears of joy"


Biggest crowdsourced project of the year

Top 2015 Kickstarter Project – Pebble Time - $20.34m USD


Social media: Instagram

Most Liked Post

Kendall Jenner


Meme of the year

Most Reblogged Meme

Pepe the Frog

Background: Pepe the Frog is an anthropomorphic frog character from the comic series Boy’s Clubby Matt Furie. On 4chan, various illustrations of the frog creature have been used as reaction faces, including Feels Good Man, Sad Frog, Angry Pepe, Smug Frog and Well Meme’d.


Twitter

Most Retweeted Tweet

Harry Styles

From boy band One Direction, Harry Styles’ tweet of gratitude to fans was sent after word came out that Zayn Malik was leaving the band. This tweet was retweeted almost 750,000 times, making it the most popular tweet of 2015 and one of the most popular messages ever published on the social media platform.


# of the year

Top Twitter Hashtags

  • Music = #OneDirection  
  • TV =  #KCA (2015 Nickelodeon Kid's Choice Awards)
  • Tech =  #iPad
  • News = #jobs
  • Stars =  #ArianaGrande

Facebook

  • Top Place = Disney theme parks
  • Top Athlete = Floyd Mayweather Jnr.
  • Top Entertainer = Ed Sheeran
  • Top Movie = Star Wars: The Force Awakens
  • Top Politician = Barack Obama
  • Top Game = FIFA 15
  • Top TV Show = Game of Thrones 

Smartphone Apps

Top Smartphone App Released in 2015 – Apple Music with approx. 55m downloads.

Best Selling Album

25 by Adele

Best Selling Song

Thinking Out Loud by Ed Sheeran


Youtube

Top Trending Video (Trending includes shares, comments and views)

Silento- Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae) #WatchMeDanceOn

Most Watched YouTube Video Released in 2015

Wiz Khalifa - See You Again ft. Charlie Puth [Official Video] Furious 7 Soundtrack

The Top 5 Trends to Watch in 2016

Monday, January 04, 2016

1. Life Tracking

Not only do we photograph much of life and share it as we go in this era of selfies and social media but armed with Go Pros and dashboard cams we video a lot of life too. However the year ahead will see tracking of life go to new levels with the use of the now ubiquitous wearable life tracking technology like the Apple watch, Microsoft band and Fitbit. Never before has there been a generation who can track, monitor, record and analyse their every moment- literally their every heartbeat- like this generation today. From steps walked to hours of sleep, to pulse monitoring, users now have access to more health data than their doctor- all uploadable and analysable. The year ahead will see apps emerge and programs developed to make this data more comparable and usable and interested parties such as health insurance companies, health advocacy groups and even local communities will provide rewards, discounts, competitions and benefits to support the wider use and corresponding healthy lifestyles that such technology encourages.

2. Technocracy

Technology is now empowering and in many ways improving democracy. Traditionally, democracy worked through corresponding with one’s local Member of Parliament, signing petitions to be tabled, and of course voting in elections. However in a technocracy, tweets, trending hashtags, likes and online campaigns have the power to reverse government decisions and influence policy priorities. Such clicktivism gives voice to those beyond adults and enrolled voters and those outside of an electoral or state boundary. The year ahead will see more sophisticated technology-driven campaigns and both viral and promoted campaigns will become more common. Just as we have seen the power of technology to influence legislation such as Uber shaping transport legislation and Air BnB impacting accommodation regulations, the mass usage of convenience and lifestyle apps will continue to shape policy.

3. Bigger Australia

In February Australia will hit its next population milestone of 24 million. And by the end of the year Sydney will be Australia’s first city to hit the 5 million mark, with Melbourne just shy of this number. While the population growth rate has slowed over the last year with slightly fewer births and declined migration numbers, Australia is still adding more than a million people every three years. In fact in 2009 when then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd talked about Big Australia the population had just hit 22 million and since then it has increased by almost 10% in just 6 years. The population forecast then was for Australia to reach almost 36 million by the middle of this century however on current trends it will exceed 40 million by then. It seems that Australians have responded to the growth with housing trends of densification, the growth in apartment living and “walkable” urban communities. In addition to this the year ahead will see policy and political responses to population growth through more focus on growing regional centres, investing in public transport and road infrastructure, airport and flight movement expansions and renewed discussion of a very fast train link between Sydney and Melbourne which together are home to 40% of the national population.

4. Brand Fatigue

Price sensitive shopping and value seeking is the new norm for Australian consumers. Cost of living pressures will continue to drive consumer demand for low prices, discounts and sales. The year ahead will see Australians adapt even more to new brands or “non brands” in an era of high quality private label brands that deliver lower prices. A new generation of consumers who are early adoptors, used to online shopping and influenced by global brands are redefining the Australian brand landscape. Even in areas that were very brand sensitive such as consumer electronics we are seeing the rapid rise of emerging brands- many of these from China. Two of the five leading global smartphone brands are Huawei and Xiaomi and emerging brands like Oppo (from China) now sit alongside the iPhone. Australian consumers are in many ways brand agnostic- but they are price believers. They are still tuned into brands that offer a great value proposition and legacy brands that have built a reputation of quality are well trusted and regarded- but the year ahead will see an ongoing challenge to maintain this relevance in a landscape of more brands, less loyalty and ongoing price sensitivity.

5. Powerworking

This is the work equivalent of power napping. With widespread Wi-Fi access and the growing acceptance of teleworking, work is increasingly being done in non-traditional places (while commuting, at home, cafés, shared spaces), and outside of the typical working hours. More importantly work is being done in bursts. The hot-desking and coworking spaces of today create more collaboration- but also more distraction. Combined with a new generation of staff used to multi-screening and shaped in an era of shorter attention spans we are seeing the emergence of a changing approach to work with chunking or micro-working meaning that work is being conducted across more hours but in a series of concentrated phases. The year ahead will see an ongoing attempt by employers to support the flexibility of modern workers and workplaces while improving productivity. This will see more tracking tools, and output measurement apps provided to measure and enable productivity.

-Mark McCrindle


IN THE MEDIA

The Australian Communities Forum

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

The Australian Communities Forum is happening again in Sydney and Melbourne 2015!

The ACF exists to help organisations understand and connect with their communities. From local, staff, constituent, membership, customer and special interest communities, this forum is focused on how to build, shape and engage communities in all their diversity.

BOOK YOUR EARLY BIRD TICKET TO THE SYDNEY #ACF15 HERE

BOOK YOUR EARLY BIRD TICKET TO THE MELBOURNE #ACF15 HERE


Whether you’re part of a community-based organisation, a charity, a government agency or a commercial organisation with a community focus, the Australian Communities Forum will deliver the latest information in an interactive format, with innovative local examples, and the sharing of great ideas.

At the one day Australian Communities Forum you will hear:

  • Results from the Australian Communities National Research study
  • Case studies of innovative community engagement projects
  • Practical, best practice workshops providing innovative strategies to equip and empower
  • Keynote sessions on volunteer engagement, motivating teams, generational change, segmentation engagement and effective public and media communication strategies.

Stay tuned for more information on guest keynote speakers, the program and more!

Keep up to date with The Australian Communities Forum 2015 on Facebook.


Q and A: Offline Parenting in an Online World

Friday, October 02, 2015

What are the key strategies to offline parenting in an online world?

Parents today are faced with an unprecedented challenge of raising their children to be engaged offline in a world dominated by online options. A recent study conducted by McCrindle Research showed that whilst 44% of the older generations see the benefit of technology to children in enhancing learning and productivity, two thirds (65%) said that they believe that school aged students today spend too much time on technology.

In a society where digital is default, parents often feel the tension of raising their children in these technologically saturated times yet ensuring that they have the timeless characteristics and qualities to thrive in the offline environment. Parents see firsthand the extraordinary opportunities that technology facilitates, yet their experience tells them that managing their children’s screen time and ensuring they gain life skills and social skills is also essential.

We often forget how quickly this great screen age has emerged. Facebook went public just a decade ago and the tablet devices which facilitate so much learning and interaction such as the iPad arrived just half a decade ago. While many of the benefits to this first-ever digitally-based, wif- connected, social-media driven, global generation are evident, so are some emerging challenges. 1 in 4 Australians aged 15-17 have not participated in any form of physical recreation or sport in the last 12 months and for those aged 18-24 it is 1 in 3. These “screenagers” have a propensity towards increased sedentary lifestyles and based on the current overweight trends amongst Australia’s youth, by 2027, when all of Generation Z have reached adulthood, 78% of males and 62% of females in this generation are likely to be overweight. Young people spending hours in front of screens is not new. Today’s parents averaged around 3 hours of TV time per day during their formative years. However the TV screen is a “lean back” screen and did not generate the same levels of time use, sleep impediments and addictive patterns of the portable, interactive and connected “lean forward” screens of today.

Parents are the key influencers when it comes to shaping the priorities and lifestyle habits of their children, so households where active offline activities are modelled, prioritised and encouraged are likely to see the rewards of these behaviours established in the next generation. Parents have the opportunity to encourage their children to engage in physical recreation not just virtual entertainment, in offline communities’ not just online networks, and face to face interaction not just screen-based communication. And if the modelling and encouraging is too subtle, parents ought remember that they are paying the internet and mobile accounts and they are in charge. Oh, and every modem comes with an off switch!

More on effective parenting strategies can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


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