24 facts about Australia at 24 million

Friday, January 22, 2016

As Australia closes in on the next population milestone of 24 million, which it will reach in February, social researcher Mark McCrindle analyses what life was like when the population was half this- and how we have changed in the 48 years since.

  1. Australia hit 12 million in 1968 and has doubled since then to hit 24 million in 2016. Over the 48 years from 1968 to 2016 Australia’s population increased by 12 million. Over the previous 48 years (1920 to 1968) the population increased by just 6.5 million.

  2. More people live in the three cities of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane today than lived in the whole nation in 1968.

  3. More than 1 in 3 Australians (8.6 million) have seen the population of the nation double in their lifetime.

  4. In the time that Australia’s population has doubled, (1968 to 2016), Tasmania has only increased by one-third (36%) while the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory have increased more than two and a half times (252% and 263% respectively)!

  5. In 1968, there were 83,807 more males than females while today there are 121,292 more females than males
  6. 1968 = 101.3 males per 100 females

    2016 = 99.0 males per 100 females


  7. 29% of the population in 1968 was aged 0-14 compared to under 19% of the population today, however there are still 1 million more under 15’s today than then.
  8. 0-14 years

    1968: 29%, 3,486,000

    2016: 18.8%, 4, 476,045


  9. In the time that the population has doubled, the number of Australians aged over 65 has more than tripled from 8.4% of the population (1,014,000) to today’s 15% of the population (3,569,556).

  10. The rate of marriages has dropped by over 40% since 1968 from 8.8 per 1000 population to 5.2 today. However there are around 20,000 more marriages annually than the 106,000 seen in 1968.

  11. The total birth rate has decreased by a quarter since 1968, from an average of 2.34 births per woman to 1.8 today. However with a population twice as large there are far more births today, exceeding 300,000 annually compared to 240,906 in 1968.

  12. The death rate has dropped by almost 30% since 1968 and life expectancy has increased by 13.2 years for males and 10.9 years for females to now exceed 80 for males and 85 for females.

  13. Standard variable interest rates were exactly the same in 1968 as today, at 5.4% while inflation was slightly higher (2.6%) compared to today (1.5%).

  14. The male average hourly wage was $1.22 and the weekly full time wage was $48.93 which in today’s dollars is $567. The current average weekly full time earnings is almost three times this at $1,484.50.

  15. Back then 1 Australian dollar bought 1.11 US dollars compared to 0.73 US dollars today.

  16. The maximum marginal tax rate was much higher at 68.4% on $32,000 and over while for the 2015-16 financial year it is 45% on $180,000 and over. The tax free threshold has also increased from $416 ($4,800 in today’s dollars) to $18,200 today.

  17. The company tax rate was 40% for private companies and 45% for public companies while for the 2015-16 year it is 30% and 28.5% for small businesses.

  18. While our population is twice as large, our economy is five times the size it was in 1968. Back then Australia’s GDP was $28,817 million ($334,072m in today’s dollars) while for the 2014-15 financial year was $1,619,195m.

  19. Men are participating in the workforce much less (male participation rate has dropped from 83.7% to 70.8%) while women are participating much more (up from 37.7% to 59.6%).

  20. Homes cost 5 times more. The median Sydney house price was around $18,000 (in today’s dollars this equates to $195,300) compared to the current Sydney median house price which exceeds $1 million.

  21. But milk, butter and potatoes cost less today.

  22. In 1968 TV was black and white, music was played on record players and the moon had not been reached.

  23. John Farnham’s Sadie the Cleaning Lady was the top song for five weeks and 1968 was the year that Hugh Jackman and Kylie Minogue were born.

  24. The postage rate in 1968 was 5 cents for a standard letter compared to $1 today. Most suburbs had twice-daily delivery service compared to the current 3-day delivery times.

  25. In the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Australia bagged 5 gold medals (17 in total) compared to an AOC target of 13 gold medals (and 37 in total) for Rio in 2016.

  26. Australia was still getting used to the new currency system, moving from the Australian pound to the Australian dollar from 1966 and we’ve gained two new coins and two new notes since then.

  27. The coins in use were the 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 cent coins. There were also notes with values of $1, $2, $5, $10 and $20.

IN THE MEDIA

 

About Mark McCrindle

Mark is an award-winning social researcher, best-selling author, TedX speaker and influential thought leader, and is regularly commissioned to deliver strategy and advice to the boards and executive committees of some of Australia’s leading organisations.

Mark’s understanding of the key social trends as well as his engaging communication style places him in high demand in the press, on radio and on television shows, such as Sunrise, Today, The Morning Show, ABC News 24 and A Current Affair.

His research firm counts amongst its clients more than 100 of Australia’s largest companies and his highly valued reports and infographics have developed his regard as a data scientist, demographer, futurist and social commentator.

Download Mark's speaking pack here

Merry Christmas from the McCrindle team

Monday, December 21, 2015

All of us here at McCrindle wish you a very Merry Christmas and a fantastic holiday break.  As social researchers we know that you'll be enjoying time with family and friends, and wishing health, happiness and peace to those around you. We hope you enjoy unwrapping the technology gifts as well as clothes and accessories you are likely to receive. Enjoy writing your Christmas cards, which would stand over 57km tall in a pile, and wrapping your presents – which would stretch 7,970km long (as a nation)!

We hope you enjoy the infographic we have put together, and that amidst the busyness of the season you have time to connect with family and friends, reflect on the Christmas story and enjoy the many things that make this country great.

Have a Merry Christmas, a fantastic 2016 and we hope you don't receive too many re-gifted presents!

- The McCrindle Team




Australia's Defining Traits

Friday, January 23, 2015
As a nation, there are traits that have defined Australia for decades, but as the times shift and trends emerge we take a look at the extent to which these are still relevant in defining us today.

1. The Lucky Country


Statistics show that Australia is doing better than ever when it comes to health, education, economic opportunities, and even political participation.

The economy is on a steady increase, even despite a recent global economic crisis. Cash flow is increasing with the net disposable income for everyday Australians now $10,000 more than it was a decade ago.

We value independence but in a community-minded way. As Aussies we recognise that individual achievement rarely occurs without a helping hand from others. After all we call this the lucky country—we don’t take the credit for it all ourselves. Despite our differences we know that when adversity strikes, whether in the form of personal tragedy, natural disasters or international conflict, there’ll usually be a fellow Aussie there to help out. It’s the tradition of the digger, the character of mateship, and it’s still the essence of the Australian community.
Fast Facts
  • Compared to the unemployment rate of the US, UK and France, Australia’s unemployment rate is lowest at just 5.8
  • The EU, G20, OECD and USA have all experienced a recession during the last 7 years, whereby Australia has not
  • Over the last 10 years Australia’s life expectancy has increased by 2 years
  • Over the last 40 years our life expectancy has increased by 10 years

2. Big Australia


Australia’s population exceeded 23 million on 23 April 2013. Having doubled since 1966, this rise is fuelled by an increase in birth rate, life expectancy and migration. These factors have allowed Australia to grow at a rate of 1.7% per year, above the world average of 1.0%. Not only is Australia the fastest growing OECD nation, but its population is increasing faster than Indonesia, India, and Malaysia.
Fast Facts
  • Australia’s population is growing by 1.7% annually
  • Australia currently has a population of 23 million people, with an increase of 397,200 people
  • Natural increase accounts for 40% of growth, adding 154,500 people to the population
  • Net overseas migration accounts for 60% of the population increase, increasing Australia’s population by 228,000 people
  • Australia’s population density is 2.99 people per km2
  • Vertical communities - with record population growth comes increase densification, where we now live up and not out
  • Traditional detached homes vs housing approvals. More new homes in greater Sydney are medium density than detached homes

3. The Clever Country


The Top 5 industries 30 years ago were all industrial (mining, utilities, manufacturing, construction, and transport) whereas today there has been a shift to professional industries (Top 5 are mining, technical, IT, financial, and utilities).

While once derogatorily referred to as the world’s quarry, it turns out that we are the clever country after all with more people than ever employed in science and technical roles. The Australian workforce has undergone significant structural change and we’ve moved from an industrial base to a knowledge base.
Fast Facts
  • The average years of schooling Australian’s engage in is 12 years
  • The number of patents granted by Australia annually is 17,877
  • 1 in 5 Baby Boomers, 1 in 4 generation X’s, 1 in 3 generation Y’s have a university degree and 1 in 2 generation Z’s will have a university degree

4. The Land of the Middle Class


Australia is the land of the fair go, where people are taken at face value and class and values based on where people are from or where they were educated don’t rate highly in interactions. Lifestyles are busy and our lives are complex but our culture is down-to-earth, and mainstream recreations are simple. Regardless of income or social status, there are rich pleasures offered in Australia, and these are all the more appreciated in times of rising living costs.

It is a collaborative rather than individualistic culture and this teamwork, a mix of mateship and altruism, creates a context where neighbourhoods and communities are defined by diversity and connecting rather than class and hierarchies.
Fast Facts
  • Australia’s median household income is $47,736. This is 2.6 times Spain’s average household income and 47 times the income of more than 30 other countries with household income below $1,100 (Spain’s is $18,531, Greece $15,823)
  • The average capital city house price in Australia is $2.5 million

5. The Small Business Nation


Australia has always been an entrepreneurial nation, with small business the backbone of the economy and the labour force. The Australian spirit of independence, a DIY attitude and the courage to give things a go are strongly demonstrated in these latest business statistics. The tough economic times and the terrain in which small business operates is having an impact, however, with only half (51%) of new business starts surviving 4 years in operation. For many Australians, the entrepreneurial dream is still alive but as demonstrated by the survival rates of new businesses, without better support, only a minority will achieve success.
Fast Facts
  • There are 2.1 million businesses in Australia
  • Just 39% are employing businesses
  • 69% of employing businesses are micro and have 1-4 employees, 6.2% are small (5-19 employees), 24.3% are medium (20-199 employees) while just 0.5% of businesses are large and employ over 200 employees
  • 50% of new businesses cease operation within 3.5 years of establishment
  • 1 in 10 cease operation every year

6. Land of the Long Weekend


Australians enjoy between 11 and 12 public holidays in addition to the 4 weeks annual leave for employees, which is more public holidays than many countries, and twice the annual leave of the average worker in the US. However Australians also work amongst the longest hours when compared to other developed nations and some of the most years of schooling. The “no worries” attitude is strong but it is more “no worries- we’ll sort it out” rather than “no worries- she’ll be right”. The “can-do” culture balances the “long weekend” mindset to shape a people who enjoy time off and know how to holiday- but work hard to earn the break.
Fast Facts
  • Australians enjoy 11 to 12 public holidays a year
  • Full time workers receive 4 weeks annual leave
  • On average, Australians work 38 hours per week, (41.0 for males and 35.8 for females)

7. The Tyranny of Distance


While Australia is warmly referred to as the land down under, the isolation and distance that the term once communicated is not the case today. While Australia is geographically a long way from the UK, it’s historical and population links with the “old country” remain strong. More importantly, it is closely located to the new epicentre of economic growth in Asia. Australia is a regional hub for many multinational organisations with operations in Asia, and is in its own right a globally connected, business influencer, cultural exporter and regional leader. The cultural cringe has given way to sophistication, cultural diversity and global influence.
Fast Facts
  • Australia’s region of Asia is home to 60% of the global population and the fastest growing nations on earth
  • China, India, Vietnam and the Philippines are all in the top 7 birth countries of Australians born overseas
  • In a 12 month time period Australia chaired the UN Security Council, hosted the G20 and will host the Cricket World Cup


For more on the facts and figures of Australia, be sure to check out our Australia Street Video Animation and Infographic.

THE AUSTRALIA STREET VIDEO ANIMATION


THE AUSTRALIA STREET INFOGRAPHIC


Christmas 2014: Traditional Values and Tight Pockets

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

In the lead up to Christmas, McCrindle Research surveyed 1,024 Australians to discover their views on the religious traditions of the season and their spending intentions for Christmas 2014.

9 in 10 Australian’s think religious traditions of Christmas should be encouraged

From angels and stars featuring on Christmas trees to nativity scenes filling shopping centres and thousands attending Carolling events across the country, it’s hard to ignore the religious traditions and symbols that characterise the Christmas season.

However it would appear that, not only do Aussie’s tolerate these religious traditions, 9 in 10 (92%) think they should be encouraged to have a public presence.


This follows a 2013 study conducted by McCrindle in which almost 8 in 10 (79%) said that Christmas was ‘becoming too commercial and all about getting stuff,’ with the same percentage stating that Christmas has lost some of its Christian meaning. 1 in 2 (49%) indicated they were unhappy about the loss of the Christian meaning associated with this holiday, further reiterated in this year’s research.

2 in 5 (41%) Australians also acknowledge that while we live in a culturally and religiously diverse nation, Christmas and its traditional and religious symbols can be shared by all and so should be encouraged.

Aussie families will seek to save again this Christmas

With the cost of living at a higher rate than ever before, Aussie families will be looking to save money where possible again this Christmas, with twice as many intending to spend less (22%) than more (11%). However, in a sign of slowly returning consumer confidence, two thirds (66%) of Australians plan to spend about the same that they did last year (a figure significantly up from 49% who reported the same thing a year ago).

While Australians still plan on saving, the financial burdens seem to have eased since last year when over a third (33%) planned on spending less, compared to 1 in 5 (22%) that will do the same this Christmas. While this rate peaked last year at 33% Australian’s are now on the recovery path, measured by consumer intention.

Like last year, Gen Y will be the biggest spenders, with 1 in 5 (20%) looking to spend more than they did last year (compared to 12% Gen X, 7% Baby Boomers and just 4% Builders).

How Aussie’s plan to save this Christmas

When asked how Australians plan on saving money this Christmas, the top 10 most featured answers included:

1. Restrict the number of presents for each person

2. Only give presents to children

3. Participate in a Kris Kringle gift-giving exercise

4. Get creative by giving hand-made gifts as presents

5. Avoid unnecessary Christmas purchases

6. Not going overboard with food

7. Do some serious bargain hunting

8. Make the most of Boxing Day sales and buy gifts after Christmas

9. Not travel at Christmas time

10. Host Christmas at someone else’s house


Download the Australian Christmas Attitudes 2014 report. Click here to download the full report.

Parents Concerned with Schoolies Celebrations

Monday, November 10, 2014

In the span of a generation, celebrating the end of Year 12 by attending a schoolies week has emerged as a rite of passage. However Australian parents have mixed views of how the celebration is played out and a third of parent’s state that they would not allow their child to participate in a “Gold Coast type schoolies week”.

-Mark McCrindle

Schoolies week has become a tradition in Australia, and the norm for how Australian students reward themselves following months of studious diligence preparing for the HSC exams.

Yet parents aren’t altogether convinced of how their young people are celebrating – nearly all Australian parents have some concern with how schoolies is celebrated and a third would stop their children from participating.

In fact, if parents were given the choice, just 1 in 5 would suggest their child participate in schoolies week as is traditionally celebrated, in a place like the Gold Coast.

THE TOP FINDINGS

• 9 in 10 Australian parents uncomfortable with how Schoolies is celebrated.

• NSW the state with the most concerned parents.

• 3 in 4 parents would prefer their child participate in a volunteer experience over Schoolies week.

• Parents hold strong preference for formal schooling after the HSC.

• Fathers (36%) are more hopeful their child will go to university or TAFE than mothers (26%).

• Less than half of Australians say that schools are effective in equipping students for the workforce.

• Older Australians least optimistic about the current education system.

To read the full analysis please click here.

The Anzac Spirit Growing with the New Generations

Thursday, April 24, 2014

If it seems like ANZAC Day is gaining support over recent years, that’s because it is. More than 1 in 5 Australians (20%) say they will “definitely” or “probably” attend an ANZAC Day service this year and more than 9 in 10 Australians (94%) agree that ANZAC Day is a very important day for commemorating those who have and do fight to defend our country and freedoms.

In the span of a generation, ANZAC Day has grown to become not just a notable public holiday, but one of the most valued days in the Australian calendar. Indeed our research last year showed that more than a quarter of Australians (30%) feel that ANZAC Day is the most meaningful public holiday for them (just behind Christmas, the holiday which 36% of Aussies say is most meaningful).

Australia is one of the world’s most culturally diverse nations with almost half of all households (46%) having one or both parents born overseas. Yet the spirit of the ANZACs and their values of courage, mateship and honour are accepted as universal values and almost 9 in 10 Australians (87%) believe that ANZAC Day unites people from all backgrounds. More than 4 in 5 (82%) disagree with the statement that “ANZAC Day is an old tradition that has served its time and is not suited to our multicultural society” and most of these (51%) strongly disagree.

In an era of mobility, reinvention and innovation, ANZAC Day provides an opportunity to pause, reflect and remember. In a time of much superficiality it delivers solemnity and substance. In a culture of the “undo” button, it holds up a picture of resilience, commitment and stoicism.

In a speech at the investiture of the first Victoria Cross in a generation, to Trooper Mark Donaldson, the Governor General Quentin Bryce identified the contrast of these great and timeless values amidst our modern, busy times when she stated:

“We award you a decoration whose words are reserved for the incomparable and unsurpassed. Words whose integrity is untouched by vernacular. Words, rare and revered. Gallantry. Valour. Self-sacrifice. Devotion to duty.”

In an era of updates, upgrades and trends, Australians have responded to this unique day of looking back, even as we look forward – lest we forget.

Research conducted from 23 to 24 April, 2014, surveying 300+ Australians. 

The 12 Stats of Christmas

Thursday, December 12, 2013

With only 12 sleeps to go until Christmas, here are our 12 Stats of Christmas! Regardless of whether you are one of the 7 in 10 who will buy some of your Christmas presents online this year or the 1 in 4 who will re-gift an unwanted present, all of us here at McCrindle hope that the lead up to Christmas will be an enjoyable time for you.

From the entire team here at McCrindle we wish you a very merry Christmas, a wonderful break and a great start to 2014! 

Click here to download the pdf

Click here to download this file

Anzac Day: Second Only to Christmas

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Anzac Day is a chance for many Australians to reflect on their freedoms and be shaped by their history. While it is certain that numbers of Australians simply enjoy the mid-week public holiday as a chance to relax or watch the footy, there is a steadfast majority of Australians who emphatically support ANZAC Day for its gentle reminder that the timeless qualities of courage, mateship, and sacrifice are worthy of remembrance and key to our national identity.

Over a quarter of Australians (30%) feel that Anzac Day is the most meaningful public holiday to them (just behind Christmas, the holiday which 36% of Aussies say is most meaningful).

Click here for to download the Research Summary.


Another McCrindle Research study showed that 95% still support setting aside a day to remember this part of our history.

This study found nearly half (49%) fully support Anzac day, 22% strongly support, and further quarter (25%) somewhat or slightly support it. Just 6% strongly agreed that Anzac Day is not relevant to a multicultural Australia, yet almost 15 times as many (88%) state that it unites people from all backgrounds due to the freedoms gained through the sacrifice of people from all cultures.

In our era of fast change and non-stop innovation, Australians have a yearning for something significant, solid and solemn. Anzac Day is one of the few dates in our calendar that gives us ceremony, tradition and time for reflection.

Supporting this, 94% of Australians agreed to some extent with the statement, “The spirit of Anzac Day continues to have meaning and relevance for our sense of national identity.” Over 3 in 5 strongly agreed with this statement (63%).

Australians see Anzac Day as a time to reflect on freedom more than anything else. 96% agreed to some extent that it is an important day to remember and honour those who have and still do fight to defend our country and freedoms, and while 7% feel strongly that Anzac Day commemorates violence and glorifies war, 54% feel strongly that it does not. Indeed 84% in total disagree with the “glorifies war” view.

There was also a significant knowledge of Anzac Day with 82% able to fill out the ANZAC acronym unprompted (although 1 in 3 of these (32%) misspelt “Corps”. However while 25 April was officially proclaimed in 1916, just 12% of respondents could correctly place this, with over a quarter (27%) having no idea and 1 in 6 (16%) believing that it began after World War 2.

Despite being hazy on some of the facts, Australians are clear that they value Anzac Day and support it. There is a recognition that change is not the same as improvement and sometimes advancement is best achieved by looking back and reflecting, not just looking forward and innovating.

Church Attendance in Australia [INFOGRAPHIC]

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Australia has more churches (13,000) than schools (9,500), and more Australians attend a church service each week (1.8 million) than there are people in South Australia (1.6 million).

And while the latest Census results show that Christianity is the religion with which most Australians identify (61.1%), well above the second most popular religion in Australia, Buddhism (2.5%), less than one in seven of the Australians who ticked “Christianity” on their census form regularly attend a church.

Easter is a time of the year when church attendance increases, but what do the 92% of Australians who are not regular church attendees think of churches, and churchgoing in 2013? Here’s our latest infographic which shares the data. Oh, and Happy Easter!


Church Attendance in Australia Infographic


Church Attendance in Australia Infographic | McCrindle Research

Easter, Australians and Christianity [INFOGRAPHIC]

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Hot Cross Buns | Easter Australia Christianity | McCrindle BlogEaster, even more than Christmas, is the time when society reflects on things religious, and so it is timely for us to share a research snapshot of Christianity in Australia.


Christianity in Australia


Christianity is still the religion to which most Australians identify (61%), having declined only slightly since the 2006 Census (64%).


Growth in the “Spiritual but not Religious” Category


However because the Census question gives the options of traditional religions only, the proportion of Australians who consider themselves as “spiritual but not religious” are forced to choose either the option of no religion, or for many of them, Christianity. Therefore the Census figure for Christianity is higher than it would otherwise be, and is an over-representation of the proportion of Australians who are adherents to Christianity.

We were commissioned by Olive Tree Media to conduct research in this area and when we asked a national sample of Australians (1,094 completed surveys) the same question but with the option of “spiritual but not religious” the proportion of Australians identifying with Christianity dropped from 61% to 40% as a result of 19% selecting this new option.


Religious Identity but less Activity


While 61% of the population (more than 14 million Australians) identify with Christianity, only about 1.8 million Australians regularly attend church (at least once per month, NCLS data ). Therefore for every Australian who nominates Christianity as their religious identity, just 1 in 8 of these participate in attendance activity.

Our research showed that of those who identify themselves as religious, just 13% are actively and regularly involved in the practicing of this through group gatherings or church attendance.


Outgrowing Religion


The decline in church attendance that has occurred in Australia over the past few decades is explained in the following chart which tracks the religious journeys of Australians. While around 1 in 4 were not raised as religious and still are not, and just over 1 in 4 were raised in a religious household and still are, the largest group of all (29%) are the “not now religious” category who were shaped in a religious household but are themselves not religious.


Significant Belief in Jesus


Australians are warm towards Christianity as demonstrated by the high identity with it, and similarly strong on belief in Christ. 4 in 5 Australians accept that Jesus was a real person from history, with almost half of these also accepting that he was the son of God (35%).


But Uncertain on the Details


When given multiple choice options, 2 in 5 Australians (42%) could correctly identify that Jesus lived in the first century AD, although more than 1 in 4 Australians (28%) have no idea in which century Jesus lived. Of particular interest were the 27% who stated that Jesus lived “in ancient times BC” (Before Christ)!

The full report is available here for purchase from Olive Tree Media

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