Christmas 2014: Traditional Values and Tight Pockets

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

In the lead up to Christmas, McCrindle Research surveyed 1,024 Australians to discover their views on the religious traditions of the season and their spending intentions for Christmas 2014.

9 in 10 Australian’s think religious traditions of Christmas should be encouraged

From angels and stars featuring on Christmas trees to nativity scenes filling shopping centres and thousands attending Carolling events across the country, it’s hard to ignore the religious traditions and symbols that characterise the Christmas season.

However it would appear that, not only do Aussie’s tolerate these religious traditions, 9 in 10 (92%) think they should be encouraged to have a public presence.


This follows a 2013 study conducted by McCrindle in which almost 8 in 10 (79%) said that Christmas was ‘becoming too commercial and all about getting stuff,’ with the same percentage stating that Christmas has lost some of its Christian meaning. 1 in 2 (49%) indicated they were unhappy about the loss of the Christian meaning associated with this holiday, further reiterated in this year’s research.

2 in 5 (41%) Australians also acknowledge that while we live in a culturally and religiously diverse nation, Christmas and its traditional and religious symbols can be shared by all and so should be encouraged.

Aussie families will seek to save again this Christmas

With the cost of living at a higher rate than ever before, Aussie families will be looking to save money where possible again this Christmas, with twice as many intending to spend less (22%) than more (11%). However, in a sign of slowly returning consumer confidence, two thirds (66%) of Australians plan to spend about the same that they did last year (a figure significantly up from 49% who reported the same thing a year ago).

While Australians still plan on saving, the financial burdens seem to have eased since last year when over a third (33%) planned on spending less, compared to 1 in 5 (22%) that will do the same this Christmas. While this rate peaked last year at 33% Australian’s are now on the recovery path, measured by consumer intention.

Like last year, Gen Y will be the biggest spenders, with 1 in 5 (20%) looking to spend more than they did last year (compared to 12% Gen X, 7% Baby Boomers and just 4% Builders).

How Aussie’s plan to save this Christmas

When asked how Australians plan on saving money this Christmas, the top 10 most featured answers included:

1. Restrict the number of presents for each person

2. Only give presents to children

3. Participate in a Kris Kringle gift-giving exercise

4. Get creative by giving hand-made gifts as presents

5. Avoid unnecessary Christmas purchases

6. Not going overboard with food

7. Do some serious bargain hunting

8. Make the most of Boxing Day sales and buy gifts after Christmas

9. Not travel at Christmas time

10. Host Christmas at someone else’s house


Download the Australian Christmas Attitudes 2014 report. Click here to download the full report.

Retirement Villages: ‘The Quiet Achievers’ – Australia’s Highest Rated Industry

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Australia’s largest and most comprehensive census of retirement village residents, the bi-annual McCrindle Baynes Village Census 2013, profiled over 5,200 retirement village residents nationally to identify the decision drivers that motivate nearly 20,000 senior Australians to make the life-changing move to a village each year.


Australia’s highest rated industry by customer rating: +25 score


Incorporated in the research, set to be released today, is a measure of the Net Promoter Score (NPS), a methodology created by Bain & Company to rate the value perceived by customers of a product or service delivered by a corporation or industry.

The most recent study of 19 Australian industries by Bain & Company delivered scores ranging from -44 (gas utilities) to +24 (online retail), with only 3 industries scoring a positive rating.

The retirement village industry, according to the November nationwide research study, scored an Australian industry leading +25 utilising the Bain & Company research technique on the question, “How likely is it that you would recommend this village to a friend?”

This compares to the average Australian industry NPS which is -15.

In fact, 98% of these ‘village people’ report being “somewhat to extremely satisfied”, with their village.

Mary Wood from the Retirement Living Council says these results are a validation of the retirement village sector’s contribution to our society:

“This report confirms that for the vast majority of people who have moved into a retirement village, the reality is just as good or better than they expected: more independence, better health, greater social interaction, increased confidence and physical security.”


2,200 Villages: One in every community


Across Australia there are over 2,200 retirement villages, providing accommodation for over 170,000 seniors over the age of 55 and up to 100+ years of age.

The Net Promoter Score was consistent across the 236 villages surveyed irrespective of whether they were operated by not-for-profit operators such as Blue Care in Queensland or large private operators such as RetireAustralia.

The three top reasons new residents chose to leave their previous home (the Push Factors) were to downsize while they still could (84%), their home was becoming too big to manage (62%) and concern about their future health (60%).

The three top reasons they liked their new village home (the Pull Factors) were that they could stay independent (87%), they had a safe environment with emergency support (87%) and were able to access village facilities (87%).


Downageing retirees: Living longer, active later, enjoying life


Residents living in retirement villages are on average older than a decade ago, with 95% aged 65+. While legislation specifies you must be 55 or older to join a village, today the average age of entry is 76. Over half (54%) of village entrants over the past two years were aged 75 or older and 1 in 3 (32%) aged 80 or above.

Approximately 8% of Australians aged 75 or older live in retirement villages.

Yet while village residents are older chronologically, they are younger from a longevity perspective than a generation ago. The recently released ABS Measure of Australia’s Progress indicates that in the last 40 years, life expectancy has increased by 10 years.

The 76 year old of today has the same life expectancy and to some extent, vigour, as the 66 year old a generation ago, explaining the significant delay in age of residents first entering retirement village living.

Social demographer Mark McCrindle summarises the situation, “Today’s village residents are downagers – a generation that are younger than their years would suggest. They’re living longer, active later, using technology more and even working later in life than previous generations of retirees. More than 1 in 7 of the retirement village age group are still in paid employment and based on these trends we will see increasing numbers of retirement village residents who are not in fact retired!”


Don’t worry, be happy: Overall happiness and life satisfaction increases when joining a village


Christopher Baynes, publisher of the village directory website villages.com.au who commissioned the report, says, “The results are consistent with our 2011 McCrindle Baynes Census and the feedback we get from the traffic on our website. Over 11,000 people each week search with us for a retirement accommodation solution”.

“The NPS score is not a surprise. We talk to residents every day across Australia. The feedback we receive is residents love the sense of community and security that a village delivers.”

Of the 1,220 people surveyed who had joined a village in the last two years, 30% stated their overall ‘happiness and life satisfaction’ had ‘increased significantly’ and a further 29% stated it had ‘increased slightly’ since moving into the village – a total of 59%. Just 7% stated that ‘happiness and life satisfaction’ had ‘decreased.’

Christopher Baynes comments: “What other industry or sector or service can claim to actually increase the happiness and life satisfaction for customers who are 75 years or older, with both the health and financial challenges that most face? It’s a pretty good place to be”.


About this Study: The McCrindle Baynes Villages Census 2013 was a national paper and online survey made up of 46 questions and completed by 5,220 retirement village residents from 23 village operators, equally distributed between private operators and not-for-profit church and charity operators.


Click here download the executive summary of the McCrindle Baynes Villages Census 2013:

The 12 Stats of Christmas

Thursday, December 12, 2013

With only 12 sleeps to go until Christmas, here are our 12 Stats of Christmas! Regardless of whether you are one of the 7 in 10 who will buy some of your Christmas presents online this year or the 1 in 4 who will re-gift an unwanted present, all of us here at McCrindle hope that the lead up to Christmas will be an enjoyable time for you.

From the entire team here at McCrindle we wish you a very merry Christmas, a wonderful break and a great start to 2014! 

Click here to download the pdf

Click here to download this file

Tight pockets are moving Aussies away from gift-giving this Christmas

Sunday, December 08, 2013

In the lead-up to Christmas, McCrindle Research surveyed 500+ Australians and found just 1 in 5 are planning to spend more this Christmas.

It’s ‘save, save, save’ this Christmas for Aussie families

Belts are tight and people are still uncertain on where the economy is going, with 48% of Australians saying that the economy will be worse next year. Over a third (33%) of Australians are planning to spend less this year than last year (up from 29% who reported the same thing a year ago).

“The savings mindset that emerged in Australia post-GFC has moved from a reactionary blip to a thrifty reality. Half of all Australians are going to keep their financial belts tight and spend the same as last year with another third planning on reducing their spend,” reports social researcher Mark McCrindle.

Generation Y (those 19-33) are more likely to spend more this Christmas than any other generation, with one third (32%) indicating that they plan to spend more on Christmas this year (compared with 15% of Gen Xers, 14% of Baby Boomers, and 15% of Builders).

A third of Australians are purchasing at least half their gifts online

Online purchases are up from last year, with 7 in 10 of Australians (cf. 6 in 10 in 2012) reporting that they plan on purchasing gifts online. In fact, 30% of Australians are buying at least half their gifts online this year.

While all Australians have caught on to online shopping, intention to make online purchases varies across the generations. While over 83% of Gen Ys and 80% of Gen Xs aim to purchase some of their gifts online, the same is true of only 63% of Baby Boomers and 48% of the Builder Generation.

McCrindle says, “Technology has been enthusiastically embraced by consumers as a means of saving money with most Australians doing at least some of their Christmas shopping online and a third buying half or most of their gifts online.”

Gift-giving down on the list of what Aussies look forward to

Despite its strong commercial focus, gift-giving is Number 6 on the list of what Australians love about Christmas. McCrindle explains: “This research shows that as the money spent on Christmas has been trimmed, the embracing of the broader aspects of the season has increased. In priority order, Christmas is about family, friends, food, festivities and faith elements (the Christmas story and carols).”

Half of Australians unhappy that Christmas has lost its meaning

Almost 8 in 10 Australians (79%) say that Christmas is ‘becoming too commercial and all about getting stuff,’ with the same percentage stating that Christmas has lost some of its Christian meaning.

1 in 2 Australians (49%) are unhappy about the loss of Christian meaning associated with Christmas, a percentage which is much higher for the Baby Boomer generation (62%) and significantly lower for Generation Y (29%).

This research highlighted the generational transitions that Australia is currently experiencing. Australians of retirement age were unanimous in their regret that Christmas has lost some of its Christian meaning and almost 2 in 3 Baby Boomers agreed however less than half of Generation X and less than a third of Generation Y felt this way.

Aussies glad that Christmas is in summer

While a third of Aussies aren’t sure of their preference, half of Australians indicate that they are glad that Christmas is in summer rather than winter.

“While Australians have grown up with lots of scenes in movies and televisions of winter yuletide, most Australians are not in fact dreaming of a white Christmas. In Australia, Christmas is synonymous with beach holidays, cricket, BBQs and sunburn – and while 1 in 5 are partial to a winter Christmas, half of Australians are glad about it being in summer,” says McCrindle.


Click here to download the full research summary.

Top Trends of 2013 [in the media]

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Today's trends are coming at us faster than ever and have a life cycle that is shorter than we've ever seen before. Trends are increasingly global – and with that, they’re bigger, better, and faster.

From Japanese onesies to New Zealand pop stars, street fashion to eye tracking devices – demographer and social analyst Mark McCrindle joins Larry and Kylie on Channel 7’s Morning Show to discuss the trends that have most shaped the agenda, driven conversations and changed social attitudes in the year now drawing to close.

Here is a discussion on the Top 13 Trends of 2013 as recently published by McCrindle:

Top 13 Trends of 2013

Monday, December 02, 2013

The social research team at McCrindle Research have summarised the Top 13 Trends of 2013 – the most talked about social fads over the past year.


1. Food Trend of the Year: FroYo


Photo Credit: Noggi

‘FroYo’ (frozen yoghurt) has become increasingly popular among Australians with its sweeter-than-ice-cream taste and endless variety of flavours, toppings, and sauces. Franchises such as Menchie’s, Moochi, Crave Australia, Yogurtland, Yogurberry, Noggi, and wowcow – not to mention countless others – have popped up in nearly every Australian shopping centre and suburb. Dessert buyers are drawn to the unique choices and oftentimes self-serve option of froyo bars, being able to make every purchase uniquely their own.

2. Word of the Year: Selfie


Photo Credit: Instagram

While selfies have been around since early MySpace and Flickr days – many featuring teenagers taking self-portraits with low-pixel cameras in front of poorly-lit bathroom mirrors – selfies are now commonplace not just among young people but even adults, eager to share self-portraits on social media sites. The action of taking selfies has been commonplace for a number of years, but it is in 2013 that the word itself has gained broader traction, being coined the ‘word of the year’ by Oxford Dictionary. Aussies should be proud, as the term ‘selfie’ can first be traced back to a comment made on an Australian internet forum from 2002. From Kevin Rudd to Barack Obama, 2013 was definitely the ‘Year of the Selfie.’

3. Attitude of the Year: Swag


Photo Credit: Bonnes Images

‘Swag’ is a popular internet slang term used to describe someone who exudes confidence, sometimes interpreted as arrogance. The term ‘swagger’ or ‘swagga’ emerged through American hip-hop tracks in the late 2000s and is also a Scottish slang word. In popular speak ‘swag’ is no longer just an internet term but is used as an affirmative compliment with a meaning similar to the word ‘cool.’ It’s unlikely that ‘swag’ will have the long-term traction that ‘cool’ has had over the years, but for now, it remains a term clearly overused, especially by Generation Z. The term ‘boss’ is used in a similar sense by Generation Ys to compliment a person who is awesome, excellent, or outstanding.

4. Pop Star of the Year: Lorde


Photo Credit: Kirk Stauffer

The 17-year old Kiwi singer-songwriter has taken the charts by storm with her single ‘Royals’ and the release of her debut album Pure Heroine in September 2013 which has risen to the Top on US, UK, and the Australian iTunes charts. As the first New Zealand solo artist to top the US Billboard Hot 100, Lorde has demonstrated musical and lyrical talent comparable to artists who have been in the industry for decades. Lorde’s first Australian show at July’s Splendour in the Grass in Byron Bay drew a crowd of 10,000 people, followed by an extensive sold-out tour across the nation in October this year.

5. Social Media Site of the Year: Vine


Photo Credit: Vine

The video-sharing app Vine was launched on January 24th 2013 and has become a popular platform to share short, six second video clips across social media networks. Vine topped the iOs App Store for most downloaded app on April 9 and within six months of its release had generated a following of 40 million users. Developed by Twitter, the app integrates a user’s Twitter information, and, similar to Instagram, features a scrollable feed of all your friends’ vines on the homescreen. Vine’s popularity has been boosted by the Facebook page, Best Vines, featuring many of the funniest and most clever vines published and has been ‘liked’ by over 18 million users.

6. Meme of the Year: Harlem Shake


What would 2013 have been without a viral beat to get the world moving and shaking? The Harlem Shake was an internet meme started by a comedy sketch video released in February 2013 that presented a group of people dancing to the song Harlem Shake by American electronic musician Baauer. Within days, uploading new variants of the dance (featuring a group of people shaking to a 30 second clip of the original song) became a viral trend and by February 15, 40,000 Harlem Shake videos had been uploaded online, totalling 75 million views with a global following. While not quite hitting the heights of Gangnam Style in 2012, the Harlem Shake has definitely been an internet sensation.

7. Viral Campaign of the Year: ‘Dumb Ways to Die’


The Dumb Ways to Die campaign is a public service announcement in the form of a 3 minute video released by Metro Trains in Melbourne that sparked immediate YouTube popularity. The video features a number of animated characters dying in idiotic ways, ending with three characters who are killed by train due to unsafe behaviours. The video had 4.7 million views within 3 days and, by November 2013, had over 65 million views.

8. Social Trend of the Year: Shared Spaces


Photo Credit: Deskmag

Community-oriented co-working spaces are now available for day use or monthly membership across Australia’s capital cities, featuring inspiring work spaces in which entrepreneurs and creative professionals can collaborate on projects with like-minded people outside of their business or industry. In the same way, social networking sites such as AirBnB and CouchSurfing are making it commonplace for individuals to lodge travellers and short-term guests in their private homes. Through collaborating in co-working spaces or providing short-term accommodation to strangers, Australians are saying goodbye to real-world privacy.

9. Media Event of the Year: The Birth of Prince George


Photo Credit: Christopher Neve

No other event this year has sparked the same level of media coverage as the birth of Prince George of Cambridge, son of Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge. Hundreds of reporters waited outside of Mary’s hospital in London for days before the birth, and when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge finally emerged with their son, crowds were ecstatic and the world was watching. Analytics reported that 5% of global news consumption across 100,000 news sites was related to the royal birth on 22 July 2013.

10. Fad of the Year: Onesie


Photo Credit: kigu.me

When Japanese performers began dressing up as cartoon characters and Miley Cyrus twerked in a unicorn onesie, Australians were quick to follow. The onesie – a one-piece jumpsuit for adults, usually replicating an animal character – hit the fashion scene to its full extent mid-2013. The Japanese label Kigu was the first mass importer of onesies in Australia, with mainstream fashion labels ASOS and Urban Outfitters soon catching on to the trend, and Australia’s leading retail stores not far behind. Young Gen Ys could be spotted at house parties, in pubs, and even on street wearing their onesies loud and proud.

11. Fashion Trend of the Year: Sportswear as Street Fashion


Photo Credit: heraldsun.com.au

2013 saw an increase in women actively wearing work-out clothes outside of the gym. Women are increasingly creating a public image around health and vitality by sporting lycra tights and bright-coloured tanks to run errands or catch up with girlfriends. Brands like Lorna Jane, LuluLemon, and Nike have mixed fashion and fitness to produce sought-after activewear that combines technology with lifestyle flair. Women are increasingly proud – and willing to pay big bucks – to be spotted in high-tech gear that has become an emblem of success and vitality.

12. Shopping Trend of the Year: Save, Save, Save


Photo Credit: costco.com.au

Increasing online shopping, bulk buying and further growth in private label brands have taken 2013 by storm, highlighting how dollar-savvy Australian consumers are. From coupon clipping to daily deal websites, Aussie consumers are increasingly looking for the best bang-for-buck when it comes to products and services. Wholesale retailers such as Costco have sprung up in New South Wales, the ACT, and Victoria, offering bulk-pricing for everyday consumables, and Aussies are buying in. Cost of living is certainly still front-of-mind for everyday Australians and it has impacted where we buy, what we buy, and how we buy.

13. Technology Trend of the Year: Kinaesthetic Devices


Photo Credit: kotaku.com.au

From the ubiquity of touch-screens to fingerprint sensors and eye tracking devices, kinaesthetic interactivity with portable devices has been on the rise. Game consoles such as Xbox One are now able to track eye movements to engage players in live-time interactivity, and gesture-controlled mouses are slowly hitting the market through tech-enthusiastic funding on Kickstarter. From Windows 8’s multitouch technology to Apple’s Touch ID designs and fingerprint sensor, there is no doubt that interconnectivity with our technology devices will continue to increase.


–Mark McCrindle

Mark McCrindle is a social researcher with an international renown for tracking emerging issues, researching social trends and analysing customer segments.


Click here to download this social analysis:

Click here to download this file


Aussies are Living Better than Ever [in the media]

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Australia is indeed the lucky country, but is life in Australia really getting better? The statistics say it is.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’s Measures of Australia’s Progress report indicates that overall, Australia is doing better than ever when it comes to health, education, economic opportunities, and even political participation.

Over the last 10 years of time the average Australians' life expectancy has increased by 2 years. In fact, over the last 40 years of time our life expectancy has increased by 10 years. Two thirds of Australians now have a qualification after completing school, with one third of Australians having a university degree.

The economy is on a steady increase, even despite a recent global economic crisis. Cash flow is increasing with the net disposable income for everyday Australians now $10,000 more than it was a decade ago. 


Social researcher Mark McCrindle joins Nine’s Today Show to talk about the latest figures.


Research Visualisation: Using Big Data to Tell Your Story

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

There are 2.5 quintillion bytes data created every day. That is so much that 90% of the data in the world has been created in the last 2 years alone.

We’re in an era of the democratisation of information. For this to be realised, big data has to be set free – and research has to be made accessible to everyone, not just to the stats junkies.


Data sets that aren't boring


The following data set contains Australia’s population growth over the last 100 years. Yet it doesn’t make much sense in this form, but when taken and compared to some other countries and presented in visual form, it presents a much clearer picture:

Since 1913, Germany has increased its population from 63 million to 80 million. The UK has gone from 45 million to 63 million. Sweden has gone from 5.5 million to 9.6 million, and all the while, Australia has increased from 4.8 million to 23.2 million.

Big data doesn’t have to be boring data! Below is the data outlining the number of Births, Deaths and Marriages in Australian each year. On its own it is difficult to interpret – but when the complexity of the data is combined with creativity of style, it yields to the relatability of the concept.

If, for example, we were to see Australia as a street of 100 households with average representation, then each year on Australia Street there would be 1.4 Marriages, 1.7 deaths, and 3.5 births.

If you were to live on a street of 100 households, and you’re street is average, then there’s a lot of activity on your street: a marriage every 9 months, a death every 7 months, and a birth every 15 weeks. That is anything but boring!


Telling stories that stick


Research methodologies matter. Quality analysis is important. But making the data visual, creating research that you can see, and ensuring the information tells a story – is absolutely critical.

There are 2 million academic papers published each year, yet most of them, 1.6 million of them, are never cited.

There are almost 7,000 PhD’s completed in Australia alone every single year. Based on the average word length, that is half a billion words of quality research published in this country each year.

Yet most PhD theses are read just 4 times. [Which is interesting because most have 3 examiners, plus at least 1 supervisor, then there’s the student themselves, which makes this statistic slightly troubling!]

So most of this great research is hardly read. Even when it is read, little is retained.

The latest neuroscience studies show that information in written form is only remembered for a limited time. Both the capacity of what we can remember and the length of time that it can be retained is limited when it is in word-based form.

However there is no known limit to the brain’s ability to store visual images. For this reason, all memory mnemonic tools rely on mental pictures.

As an example, take our written report on our research conducted into happiness and money. In this form, the insights are not easily gained, but in just one graph, it can be seen that despite what many may think, those with an income significantly above average had a lower proportion of people with happiness significantly above average.

Those with incomes below average actually had the highest proportion of people with happiness, satisfaction and fulfilment above average! In a simple snapshot, research proves what we already know: that money can’t buy happiness.

This is our story. This is your life. Data is too important to be left in the hands of statisticians alone. Research needs to get beyond the researchers.


In a world of big data-we’re for visual data. We believe in the democratisation of information-that research should be accessible to everyone not just to the stats junkies. We’re passionate about turning tables into visuals, data into videos and reports into presentations.

As researchers, we understand the methods, but we’re also designers and know what will communicate and how to best engage.

Visit researchvisualisation.com for more info.

Generation Rent [in the media]

Friday, November 15, 2013

The amount of first time buyers taking out home loans has fallen to its lowest level in almost a decade.

Compared to 30 years ago, there’s now twice as many Australians renting, and for many Generation Y's now in their 20’s and 30’s, buying their own home will now seem almost unattainable.


Mark McCrindle joins Today Tonight on the topic of Generation Rent – outlining how difficult it is today for young people to break into the property market.


Today it is twice as hard for young people to buy their first property compared to when their parents were starting out, because they’re not just competing with other first home buyers but also with investors, self-managed super funds, trusts and overseas buyers.

Four decades ago, an average home in a capital city was 5 times the average annual earnings, and today it’s 10 times average annual earnings.

It’s not all bad news – in many areas, particularly in the inner city suburbs, it is much cheaper for young people to rent than buy, and as long as they’re investing and not spending everything on lifestyle pursuits, young people will get ahead even without home ownership.


Research Visualisation: Moving from Clichés to Playing with Data

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Data interpreted through traditional bar graphs, pie charts, and line graphs do not suffice in engaging the coming generation. Big data interpreted solely through these traditional mediums are the equivalent of clichés in our communication, sounding more like background noise. While there may be meaning, there is a distinct lack of clarity.

We researched Australians to find their most irritating clichés – phrases like “push the envelope”, “think outside the square” and “calling to touch base” were all mentioned.

Here are the Top 10 clichés used. [What is even more fascinating, is if they are read from end to end, the result is a fairly coherent political speech]:

We won’t be ruling anything in or out
Because at the end of the day
There’s no magic bullet
And the jury is still out on that anyway
But having said that
Can I just say
Moving forward
It’s a no brainer
We’re going to hit the ground running
And give 110%.

Just as cliché’s lose their meaning over time, so do traditional methods of portraying data.


Information that impacts


World’s-best research will only spread as far as the look of it allows. World-changing data will have no impact unless it is well designed. World-class information will remain unshared unless it is easily understood.

Research that makes a difference has to be seen with the eyes of your head as well as the eyes of your heart. It makes sense rationally, and you get it viscerally.

Until the last excel table has been transformed there’s work to be done. Statistics should be fun – like animation. People should be able to play with data. Research reports should not sit on shelves but be interacted with, and shared on social media, or printed on book marks or beamed onto buildings.

That’s how information was shared THEN.

It’s what we’ve got back to NOW.

It’s how research will be shared NEXT too.

It’s about turning tables into visuals, statistics into videos and big data into visual data. Research can’t be applied until it’s been understood – it needs to be seen, not just studied. It’s research that you can see.


In a world of big data-we’re for visual data. We believe in the democratisation of information-that research should be accessible to everyone not just to the stats junkies. We’re passionate about turning tables into visuals, data into videos and reports into presentations.

As researchers, we understand the methods, but we’re also designers and know what will communicate and how to best engage.

Visit researchvisualisation.com for more info.

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